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  • Winter 2023 Education Series II - To Everything There is a Time: Exploring Ecclesiastes


Winter 2023 Education Series II - To Everything There is a Time: Exploring Ecclesiastes

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2023
  • 7:00 PM
  • Zoom

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LHI’s Education Committee presents our second Winter 2023 Education Series, To Everything There is A Time: Exploring Ecclesiastes, led by Rabbi and scholar Dayle Friedman.

The book of Qohelet (Ecclesiastes) is a remarkable account of one person’s quest for meaning. The narrator (said by the rabbis to be an aging King Solomon) has tried to find meaning through money, power, and pleasure, but concluded that all of these are but fleeting distractions. As we explore this surprisingly stark text, we will ourselves wrestle with what Viktor Frankl called “Man’s Search for Meaning,” and will see what wisdom we can gain from the search, as well as from the text itself.

All sessions will be on Zoom and will begin at 7:00 pm. Leyv Ha-Ir members will automatically receive the Zoom info.  Guests must register for each session.  Zoom links will be sent the day before the program.

There is no charge for these programs.  It is suggested that guests make a donation of $18 or an amount of their choice to support Leyv Ha-Ir's programing. Donation information is here.

Texts from the book (and elsewhere) will be provided to be reviewed before each session.

Session I – March 14           
Kohelet is an existentialist text – so what is this book doing in the TaNaCh (Hebrew Bible)? 

Kohelet questions some of the basic assumptions of the Tanach – that our efforts are meaningful, that goodness will be rewarded – and seems to offer a cynical worldview. 

Why would this text have been included in the Tanach, and how did the rabbis understand its place?

Session II – March 28         
Breath of breaths (vanity of vanities): time and impermanence

Kohelet teaches that everything we cherish is fleeting. How can we understand the import of this teaching for the conduct of our lives? Does this impermanence render everything meaningless, or more charged with value?

Session III - April 11              
Seeking meaning in the face of death and aging

Kohelet’s last chapter offers a dark portrayal of the challenges of aging. Is this our experience? Does the book propose any message of nehemta/consolation? How might Kohelet’s insistence on our finitude prompt us to find meaning? 

About Rabbi Dayle: 

Rabbi Dayle Friedman, MSW, MAJCS, BCC, is a is a spiritual guide, social innovator, chaplain, and scholar. She has been a leader in the fields of spirituality and aging, pastoral care, and Jewish healing. She served as interim rabbi of Leyv Ha-Ir~Heart of the City in 2019-2020 during Rabbi Julie Greenberg’s sabbatical. Her recent publications include Jewish Wisdom for Growing Older: Finding Your Grit and Grace Beyond Midlife, and Jewish End-of- Life Care in a Virtual Age: Our Traditions Reimagined, which she co-edited.

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